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SOLVER Nano

Atomic Force Microscope
for Research & Education
Solver Nano - affordable AFM/STM system with advanced capabilities

 

Overview Specifications Downloads HOW TO BUY Accessories
 

AFM holds a strong positions in scientific research as is used as a routine analytical tool for physical properties characterization with high spatial resolution down to atomic level. Solver Nano is the best choice for scientists who are need a single instrument that is an affordable, robust, user-friendly and professional tool.

Applications

Scientific research Education Metrology control

Solver Nano - AFM for science.

Solver Nano is designed by the NT-MDT team that also created High Performancel Systems like Ntegra, NEXT and Spectra which have been proven in the scientific community through many key publications. 

Solver Nano is equipped with a professional 100 micron CL (closed loop XYZ) piezotube scanner with low noise capacitance sensors. Capacitance sensors in comparison with strain gauge and optical sensors have lower noise and higher speed in the feedback signal. The CL scanner is controlled by a professional workstation and software.
These capabilities enable all of the basic (http://www.ntmdt.com/spm-principles) AFM techniques in compact SPM design.

Because the SolverNano can be employed in diverse areas of research as AFM tool, several research examples are shown below: :

  1.  Polymers
  2.  Bio objects
  3.  Carbon Materials

The following samples were provided by Customers: Nitrocellulose membrane,  Celgard, Polystyrene Polybutadiene (PS/PBD), Graphene.

Configuration and experimental setup:

  •  Solver Nano with AFM head.
  •  CL 100 um piezotube scanner. CL enabled.
  • Digital controller.
  • Active vibration isolation.
  • Results from intermittent contact mode (topography, phase, and amplitude image).


Sample: Nitrocellulose membrane.

Intermittent Contact mode results from a Nitrocellulose membrane sample.
NSC_05/20° whisker cantilever was used which has a spring constant of 13 N/m and a resonance of 210 kHz.

Scanning parameters: 4.0x4.0 um scanning area with 512x512 points, and scanning rate of 1 Hz.
 
Topography Topography with section line Cross section profile


Sample: Microporous Polypropylene (PP) Membrane (Celgard),

Intermittent Contact mode results from a Celgard sample;
A NSC_05/20° whisker cantilever was used which has a force constant of 13 N/m and resonance of 210 kHz.

Scanning parameters: 20 x 20 um and 5x5 um scanning areas with 512x512 points, and scanning rate of 3 Hz

Topography  Phase Topography with section line Cross section profile

Scanning parameters: 2.5x2.5 um scanning area with 512x512 points, and scanning frequency of 30 Hz

Topography  Phase Topography with section line Cross section profile 


Sample: Polystyrene Polybutadiene (PS/PBD).

Intermittent Contact mode results from a phase separated blend of Polystyrene Polybutadiene (PS/PBD).
A NSC_05/20° whisker cantilever was used which has a spring constant of 12 N/m and a resonance of 201 kHz.

Scanning parameters:  20 x 20 um and 5x5 um scanning areas with 512x512 points, and scanning rate of 2.5 Hz.
 
Topography (20x20 um) Phase Topography (5x5 um) Phase


Sample: Long DNA

It is important to note that all data was collected during an on-site demonstration without any filters applied to adjust the raw data.
Intermittent Contact mode results from long stands of DNA/Mica sample;
A NSG03 cantilever was used which has a spring constant of 2 N/m and a resonance of 80 kHz.
Topography, amplitude and phase image were recorded simultaneously

Scanning parameters: 2.0x2.0um scanning area with 512x512 points, and scanning rate of 0.8 Hz
 
Topography Phase Amplitude
 
Topography with section line Cross section profile Topography with section line Cross section profile


Sample: Short DNA on Mica

Intermittent Contact mode results from short strands on DNA/Mica sample.
A NSG03 cantilever was used which has a force constant of 2 N/m and resonance of 80 kHz.
Topography and phase images were recorded simultaneously.

Scanning parameters: 1.5x1.5um scanning area with 512x512 points, and scanning frequency of 0.7 Hz.
 
Topography Phase
 
Topography with section line Cross section profile


Sample: Circular DNA on Mica

Intermittent Contact mode results from circular DNA/Mica sample.
A NSG03 cantilever was used which has a spring constant of 2 N/m and a resonance of 80 kHz.
Topography, amplitude and phase images were recorded simultaneously.

Scanning parameters: 900x900 nm scanning area with 512x512 points, and scanning rate of 0.5 Hz
 
Topography Phase Amplitude
 
Topography with section line Cross section profile


Sample: Graphene on Si substrate

Topography and surface potential image were recorded simultaneously
A NSG03 cantilever was used which has a spring constant of 2 N/m and a resonance of 90 kHz.
Topography and surface potential  were recorded simultaneously

Scanning parameters: 5.0x5.0um scanning area with 512x512 points, and scanning rate of 1.1 Hz.
 
Topography Topography with section line Cross section profile Surface potential 

Why is nanotechnology interesting for education?

Cutting edge achievements in science and most successful R&D projects in commercialization are on an interdisciplinary level, combining physics – chemistry –biology - mathematics – engineering – technology - IT. The earliest, widespread description of nanotechnology refers to the particular technological goal of precisely manipulating atoms and molecules for fabrication of macroscale products. Proceeding further down to atomic scale, where no border between the scientific disciplines exist and all of them are essential for developers and scientists to understand the technological processes.

Thus using this interdisciplinary approach to the education of students provides a very effective integration and coaches graduate students to fit into an innovative national economy. Scientific projects (school science, pre- college science and etc.) allow to cope with interdisciplinary connections, develop an interdisciplinary approach, form systematically scientific thinking and learn more about modern problems of physics, chemistry, biology and nanotechnology. This is the one of the mission of STEM centers.

Inter-chair resource center of collective use “Nanocenter” DSTU.
Laboratory work of students speciality “Nanomaterials”.

In the new scientific world of nanotechnology a widespread opinion persist that there are two important modern developments: the atomic force microscope (AFM) and the scanning tunnel microscopy (STM). Those are the instruments that have launched nanotechnology due to the fact that scanning probe microscopes are not limited by the wavelength of sound or light and can achieve high resolution results under a variety of environmental conditions..


     
HOPG atomic resolution, STM scan size 2×2 nm. Solver Nano on 100x100 um CL scanner.

SOLVER Nano is enabled for teaching principles of scanning probe microscopy and acquiring skills for studying nanoobjects and microstructures. Students can also perform all modern AFM and STM techniques with SOLVER Nano:
In Air: AFM (contact and intermittent contact), AFM spectroscopy, AFM lithography (force, current, voltage), Lateral Force Microscopy, Force Modulation Microscopy, Spreading Resistance Imaging, Piezoresponce Force Microscopy and Switching Spectroscopy, EFM, Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy, MFM, STM (microscopy, spectroscopy, lithography).
In liquid: Contact and Amplitude Modulation AFM, AFM Spectroscopy, AFM Force Lithography, Lateral Force Microscopy.

SOLVER Nano for education provides complete didactic materials for different skill levels of young aspiring scientists.
Basic level: to demonstrate various phenomena and develop skills to work on modern equipment.
Advanced level: designed for advanced studies with higher skilled students to provide insights on composite nature of modern research and interdisciplinary connections.
Research level: performed individually. Example are given on actual problems to demonstrate the structure of scientific research, form skills of designing and performing experiments, work with scientific advisers – tutors and prepare to engage in independent research.

Advanced project block scheme.
“synthesis and research properties of carbon materials”

  
 
 

The book atomic force microscopy written by V. Mironov is included. 
This book was translated into different languages and is very popular among NT-MDT customers.
Additional we provide a vast amount of freeware materials for education purposes.
Flash animation of SPM principles. 
Video presentation and video courses from “SPM in general” to “how to process the AFM image”.
Experience from our customers in practical and scientific work performed by young scientists.  

SOLVER Nano for metrology applications.
SOLVER Nano AFM can be used for educational / scientific projects as well as for routine measurements. It can also be used as a metrological tool for the determination of linear dimensions of objects in the nanometer range.

Technical requirements for metrology appliocations:

  •  Large field scanner – 100x100 um piezotube scanner.
  •  High level XYZ linearity - < 0.1%
  •  Low noise XY sensor – < 0.3 nm in closed loop, < 0.05 nm open loop
  •  Low noise Z sensor – < 0.04 nm in closed loop, < 0.01 nm open loop
  •  Precision capacitance sensors.
  •  Professional software with the common metrological protocols.

Sample: Metrology test sample TDG, period 278 nm.

Signal: Topography.
Scanning parameters: 10.0x10.0 um scanning area with 512x512 points, and scanning rate of 2 Hz

  Texture direction, Std    33.750 deg
Texture direction index, Stdi    0.295
Radial Wavelength, Srw    4.998 um
Radial Wavelength Index, Srwi    0.0494
Wavelength    0.277 um
Frequency    3.606 1/um
Function Value    9.806 nm^2
X    2.000 1/um
Y    -3.000 1/um
Angle    -56.309 deg.
Topography FFT Power spectrum with cross section line   Metrological protocol


Sample: Metrology test sample TGG, period 3 um

Signal: Topography. 
Scanning parameters: 60.0x60.0 um scanning area with 512x512 points, and scanning rate of 1 Hz
 
 

Texture direction, Std  -89.030  deg
Texture direction index, Stdi    0.0515
Rad. Wavelength, Srw    2.999 um
Rad. Wavelength Index, Srwi   0.0143
Wavelength   2.999 um
Frequency   0.333 1/um
Function Value  0.0537 nm^2
X   0.333 1/um
Y   -0.000000000000000256 1/um
Angle   0.070 deg.

Topography (3D)  Topography (2D) FFT Power spectrum with cross section line   Metrological protocol


Sample: Metrology test sample TGZ2, period 3 um, relief height 94 nm. 

Signal: Topography.
Scanning parameters: 60.0x60.0um scanning area with 512x512 points, and scanning frequency of 2 Hz

  Texture direction, Std   88.945 deg
Texture direction index, Stdi   0.0421
Rad. Wavelength, Srw   2.999 um
Rad. Wavelength Index, Srwi   0.0167
Wavelength   2.999 um
Frequency   0.333 1/um
Function Value   557.454 nm^2
X   0.333 1/um
Y   
-0.000000000000000256  1/um
Angle  0.000 deg.
Topography Topography Height Histogram FFT Power spectrum with cross section line   Metrological protocol


Sample: Metrology test sample TGQ, period 3 um, height 19 nm

Signal: Topography.
Scanning parameters: 60.0x60.0um scanning area with 512x512 points, and scanning rate of 3 Hz

Topography (3D)

Topography (2D)
 
Topography Height Histogram
 
Texture direction, Std    -89.296 deg
Texture direction index, Stdi    0.150
Rad. Wavelength, Srw    2.999 um
Rad. Wavelength Index, Srwi    0.0571
Wavelength    2.999 um
Frequency    0.333 1/um
Function Value    5.926 nm^2
X    0.333 1/um
Y    -0.000000000000000256 1/um
Angle    0.000 deg.
  Texture direction, Std    -89.296 deg
Texture direction index, Stdi    0.150
Rad. Wavelength, Srw    2.999 um
Rad. Wavelength Index, Srwi    0.0571
Wavelength    2.999 um
Frequency    0.333 1/um
Function Value    2.450 nm^2
X    
-0.000000000000000256 1/um
Y   0.333 1/um
Angle    90.000 deg.
FFT Power spectrum with hor. cross section line   Metrological protocol FFT Power spectrum with vert. cross section line   Metrological protocol

 

 
 
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